Jorge Moll: A Professional Neuroscientist

Jorge Moll is a graduate in medicine from a reputable institute of Rio and has a Ph.D. in the same field. He currently holds the position of a president-director at the board of IDOR, Rio de Janeiro – an institute that focuses on overseeing various educational and research activities in Brazil. He is also the senior researcher at D’Or Institute for research and education and, heads the research on Cognitive Neuroscience Unit and Neuroinformatics at the same institution. He was elected at the governor’s level at the board of members of the International Neuroethics Society in 2012 and as from 2015; he is currently visiting scholar award at Stanford Neuroscience Institute, Stanford University. Visit Jorge’s profile on facebook.com.

He has taught numerous institutions including the National Institute of Health, NIH in Estados Unidos between 2004 and 2007. He also taught at the University de Sao Paulo, USP, and Brazil between 1999 and 2004 after having shared his knowledge with the Graduate school of Medicine in the University of Federal do Rio de Janeiro, UFRJ, Brazil.

Jorge Moll researches mainly focused on the human moral cognitive neuroscience, which is a drastically growing medical research aiming at determining the neurotically basis of human forms in terms of social cognition and behavior. According to Jorge recent clinical evidence, it is in order to say that there is a notable consistency of human brain network, which influences moral cognition. His research results fostered a new interpretation of human social behavioral disability, especially in individuals with brains dysfunction. Hence, he proposed advancement in the research on the functioning of the humans’ brains in order to understand fully the links between natural thoughts and the cognition thoughts, which influences future actions, cognition memory retrieval, and conceiving the perspective of other human beings.

View: https://interview.net/jorge-moll/

In his research, he concluded that there is a significant relevance of the human default network for understanding mental capability including autism, Alzheimer, and schizophrenia diseases. Through his research and his ambitions in neuroscientist, he has managed to achieve various awards in the field including the Research Fellow NIH award between 2004 and 2007, which attributed to his election as an affiliated member of the International Neuroethics Society between 2012 and 2013.

Finally, he is currently the head of the cognitive neuroscience unit at workgroup in IDOR. One of his major conclusion in human brain research is that the implications of anatomical observations should be researched further in relation to possible adaptive roles of the human brain default network using the past sample experience. Visit Ideamensch to know more about Jorge Moll.

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